Hypertension drug can be reused to slow aging

Overview: Rilmenidine, a drug commonly prescribed to treat hypertension, may help slow the effects of aging and extend lifespan, a new study reports.

Source: University of Liverpool

Researchers have found that the drug rilmenidine can extend life and slow down aging.

The findings, published in Aging Cell, show that animals treated at a young and older age with rilmenidine, which is currently used to treat hypertension, increased longevity and improved health characteristics, mimicking the effects of calorie restriction.

They also demonstrate the health and longevity benefits of rilmenidine treatment in roundworm C. elegans are mediated by the I1 imidazoline receptor nish-1, identifying this receptor as a potential longevity target.

Unlike other drugs previously studied by the researchers for this purpose, the commonly prescribed, oral antihypertensive drug rilmenidine has potential for future translatability to humans, as side effects are rare and not serious.

To date, a calorie-restricted diet is considered the most robust anti-aging intervention, promoting longevity in all species. However, studies of calorie restriction in humans have had mixed results and side effects, meaning that finding drugs like rilmenidine that can mimic the benefits of calorie restriction is the most reasonable anti-aging strategy.

It depicts an elderly lady
Unlike other drugs previously studied by the researchers for this purpose, the commonly prescribed, oral antihypertensive drug rilmenidine has potential for future translatability to humans, as side effects are rare and not serious. The image is in the public domain

Professor João Pedro Magalhães, who led the research at the University of Liverpool and is now based at the University of Birmingham, said: “With a global population aging, the benefits of slowing down aging, even if just a little, are huge. Drug repurposing that can extend longevity and health has enormous untapped potential in translational geroscience.

“For the first time, we have been able to demonstrate in animals that rilmenidine can extend life. We now want to investigate whether rilmenidine may have other clinical applications.”

financing: This study was conducted by researchers from the University of Liverpool, ETH Zurich and Harvard Medical School, and funded by the Swiss National Science Foundation, LongeCity and the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council.

About this news about pharmacology and aging research

Writer: Jennifer Morgan
Source: University of Liverpool
Contact: Jennifer Morgan – University of Liverpool
Image: The image is in the public domain

Original research: Open access.
“Rilmenidine extends longevity and health in C. elegans via a nischarin I1 imidazoline receptor” by João Pedro Magalhães et al. Aging cell


Abstract

Rilmenidine extends lifespan and health of C. elegans via a nischarin I1 imidazoline receptor

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Drug repurposing that can extend longevity and health has enormous untapped potential in translational geroscience.

Here we searched for known compounds that elicit a similar gene expression signature to calorie restriction and identified rilmenidine, an I1-imidazoline receptor agonist and prescription medication for the treatment of hypertension.

Let’s deal with that then Caenorhabditis elegans with rilmenidine in young and old age extends life. We also show that stress resistance, health duration and longevity benefit from treatment with rilmenidine C. elegans are mediated by the I1 imidazoline receptor nish-1implying this receptor as a potential target for longevity.

Consistent with the shared signature mimicking calorie restriction, in addition to rilmenidine to calorie restriction C. elegans, genetic reduction of TORC1 function, or treatment with rapamycin did not extend lifespan further. The rilmenidine-induced lifespan required the transcription factors FOXO/DAF-16 and NRF1,2,3/SKN-1. F

In addition, we find that autophagy, but not AMPK signaling, was required for rilmenidine-induced lifespan. In addition, transcriptional changes similar to caloric restriction were observed in liver and kidney tissue in mice treated with rilmenidine.

Together, these results reveal a geroprotective and potential mimicking effect of caloric restriction by rilmenidine that warrants new lines of research on this compound.

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